01223 712200    office@queenedith.cambs.sch.uk

Reception 2022 Visit

Reception 2022 Visit on Wednesday 12th January at 9.15am will now be a virtual event. Please call the School Office to be sent the Zoom link – (01223) 712200

English / Literacy

English Curriculum

At Queen Edith we believe that literacy and communication are key life skills. Through the English curriculum, we will help children to develop the skills and knowledge that will enable them to communicate effectively and creatively through spoken and written language and equip them with the skills to become lifelong learners. We want children to enjoy and appreciate literature and its rich variety.

The English curriculum at Queen Edith is delivered using the National Curriculum English Document. The Early Learning Goals are followed to ensure continuity and progression from the Early Years Foundation stage through to the National Curriculum. Where appropriate, literacy units will link to creative curriculum themes to promote cross curricular learning.

Reading

Reading is an important part of the English curriculum at Queen Edith. By the time they leave us to move onto secondary school, we want all children to be able to read fluently, with enjoyment and good understanding. They should be able to write clearly, accurately and creatively, sharing their ideas with confidence. As well as this, they should also have mastered being able to speak confidently and listen to others carefully and with respect.

We help children to acquire these skills through dedicated daily literacy lessons, but also by focusing on the key skill of Communicating across the whole curriculum.

Reading record books are used to record when the children have been listened to in School by a member of staff or a volunteer, and at home, and any issues or positives there may be. Children who have moved on from the reading scheme have access to the school’s free reader book selection.

Shared reading takes place within English lessons to provide enriching experiences through more challenging texts. Teachers also share stories with the class displaying an enthusiasm for reading and setting a positive example as a reader.

As part of the Literacy curriculum each child takes part in guided reading sessions. These sessions are led by the class teacher and allow the children to develop their reading and comprehension skills.

Bug Club Video for Parents

A video for parents to show them how to access Active Learn – Bug Club:

At the bottom of this page you will find suggested reading lists for children.

Writing

Shared and modelled writing takes place within English lessons. This allows the teacher to demonstrate good writing practice to the children while using their ideas. Teachers ensure that the writing demonstrated shows high expectations and covers the success criteria they would expect to see in the children’s writing.

Talk for writing is used successfully across the school to help children to gather ideas and structure their writing.

Children are expected to write frequently in a range of forms. This may be responses to a text, filling in text feature grids, short writing tasks such as writing as a character or writing a whole story or report as an extended piece of writing.

In the  English curriculum, grammar, punctuation and spelling now play a key role in the children’s writing. These skills are taught and then inserted into writing tasks so that the children can put their learning into practise. These skills are referred to during English lessons and children are encouraged to integrate their grammar and spelling learning within their writing.

For more information please click on the link to view our Reading and Writing Policies on our Policies page.

 

On Tuesday 24th September, KS2 were delighted to welcome author Sam Copeland to talk to us about his new book ‘Charlie Turns into a T-Rex’. His books are about a boy who changes into all sorts of different animals whenever he is stressed or upset. It’s about all sorts of scrapes and adventures – but it’s also about anxiety. Sam spoke to us about the wild world including all sorts of mad, crazy and downright disgusting animals. He also gave a reading from his work, shared where he got his ideas behind the series and even signed our copies of the books!

Examples of Learning

Year 6

Varying sentence lengths for effect

November

In English, just after Halloween, Year 6 were tasked to create a short paragraph that was as scary as possible, placing emphasis on certain words or pauses that would affect the reader. We wrote these in an eerie silence, then read them aloud in darkness with just a torch to set the mood.

Here are some of our paragraphs – which one do you think is most effective and why?

One soundless night, I was walking through a pitch-black alleyway to get home. I felt a shadow move. I turned as quick as a flash. There was nothing. I took a deep breath. Suddenly, there was a bang! What could it be? A light flickered in the creepy alleyway. SP

The pitch-black woods shadowed the figure behind me. You could only just make out the looming trees which covered the forest. I thick brown blanket of leaves lay on the ground. I sprinted. Should I stop? I knew I was being followed. The only light guiding me was the bright moon and the gentle breeze made my golden hair blow. I stopped. The leaves rustled. I turned slowly to see that the figure had stopped too. My heart was pounding and the wind was now howling. I felt the cold air slap against my face. Suddenly, I heard a bloodcurdling scream… SC

Suddenly, the door closed. Bang!! We realised that we were trapped inside as we tried to open the door but it was locked. A light flickered then a shadow moved. It came closer and closer. I looked away for a moment. With fear, I felt someone breathing down my neck. MM

I walked slowly down the crumbled, rocky path. Straining my ears, I tried to hear a scuffle of footsteps or a coat rustling in the wind, but I heard nothing. Suddenly, a flicker of light caught my eye. Slowly, I turned around…  Behind me stood a tall, thin stranger, wearing only black. Deep cuts scarred his pale, white face and where his eyes should have been were two empty, black holes that seemed to stare into my soul. Heart pounding, I turned and quickened my pace. So did the stranger.